An oil production freezing deal will be discussed on April 17th in Doha, Qatar.
Oil producing countries intend to freeze production without Iran’s support, who refuses to freeze or cut its output after years of sanctions.
The current global production is achieving record highs, prompting analysts to argue that an output freeze deal might not have a real impact in the oil market. International Energy Agency data’s (chart 1 & chart 2) points to an average production excess in 2015’s 4th quarter of 2 million barrels per day.
Eva Sjekelova [1] reporting Neil Atkinson, a senior executive at the International Energy Agency:
A freeze on production is perhaps rather meaningless. It's more some kind of gesture which perhaps is aimed
... to build confidence that there will be stability in oil prices.

Oil prices have been rebounding lately from January’s lows, relying almost on production freezing intentions. A dovish Fed, a weaker dollar and tiny recovery signals from China have boosted the process. Myra P. Saefong and Jenny W. Hsu [2] on China's oil consumption:
In February, China’s crude imports rose nearly 25% on-year to 31.8 million metric tons, equivalent to roughly 8
million barrels a day
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