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The British consumer confidence has suffered its biggest drop in more than 20 years.
Post referendum sentiment unveils doubts over how the British economy will behave as non-EU member.
A survey by market research group GfK revealed a deep fall in the confidence among consumers from -1 to -9, as shown in the Infographic (source: www.gfk.com).
The details of Britain’s exit are murky, at best. There are a lot of uncertainties over the period where the Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty will be triggered.
Unless these questions are answered and a clear path forward emerges, the pound outlook will remain posed for the downside.
There appears to be little in the way of technical support to stop the currency from breaching several support areas in the months ahead.
Property prices in the UK and in London specifically, have come under pressure in the run-up to the EU referendum, as well as following it.
Dukascopy Research products [1] revived that:

June was the worst month in seven years period for the Britain’s builders since construction PMI entered a
contraction territory, (...) slipping to 46.0 points, from 51.2 (...)
Mark Carney highlighted (...) [that the] central bank would have to provide more[/that]
[/1]…
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Sveetlana avatar
Sveetlana 29 July

interesting...

voldemar avatar
voldemar 29 July

nice article

fxsurprise8 avatar

interesting views fella :)

Yulia10 avatar
Yulia10 31 July

good job

FXRabbit avatar
FXRabbit 26 Aug.

Very interesting article!

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24/51
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Central Banks are clustering negative interest rates as a new fashionable monetary policy tool. After Sweden, Switzerland and Denmark, the new fellows are the Bank of Japan and the European Central Bank.
The ECB has cut a key rate further into negative territory in March 2016. It now charges banks 0,4% to hold their cash overnight. Draghi said that the central bank’s stimulus measures are intended to last until March 2017 or longer if necessary.
The Bank of Japan has also adopted the negative interest rates strategy. It is now charging banks 0,1% for parking additional reserves, with the aim to encourage lending and prompt businesses and savers to invest.
It seems that central banks are all seeking a weaker exchange rate without weighing the risk of an open currency war, losing their ability to boost prices and competitiveness through currency devaluation.
Negative interest rates reduces the cost of borrowing and perhaps should spike demand for loans. Jana Randow and Simon Kennedy [1] noticed:
that when banks absorb the cost themselves, it squeezes the profit margin between their lending and deposit rates,
and might make them even less willing to lend. (...) negative rates haven’t spa
[/1]…
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zarina avatar
zarina 16 Apr.

good work!!! Thank you

black_box_xx avatar

great! thank you for your article :)

Kivetat avatar
Kivetat 19 Apr.

Good job))

rajib217 avatar
rajib217 23 Apr.

Great article

TaniaS avatar
TaniaS 5 May

Very interesting!

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